Wednesday, February 3, 2016

triathlon

Tour of NZ Epic-logue

We were blessed with great weather and tailwinds for our final stage into Bluff at the bottom of the South Island.

A few of us decided to tack-on a very steep climb up Bluff Hill at the end. How steep? We had three Kona-qualifiers walk sections and a fourth flipped his bike over backwards and landed on his head. Thankfully, no injuries. The scariest part for me was riding back down!

We then rolled to Land’s End for photos and backslapping! I was surprisingly emotional down there. Likely from a mixture of: fatigue; exhaustion; endorphins and the removal of stress.

I have a feeling that this trip will mark a closing of a chapter of my life – I wanted to give Molina a big hug but thought that I might start crying so just sat there working on my breathing! Everything that I achieved as a triathlete is due to Scott taking an interest in me.

Standings To End Day 13

A few changes in the overall today as folks stepped up for the swim/bike/run bonus.

PROVISIONAL

Enjoy Your Life & True Strength

Those of you on my blog feed will have seen that I quoted Clas' advice yesterday. In Swenglish, "better to enjoy your life".

Yesterday had it all at Epic Camp - sun, rain, hot, cold...

We started the day with a classic Christchurch run around Godley Head - Clas and I took a route that had a few extra hills - if you ever get out there then we took the High Trail that goes over the mtn tops along the crater rim. The faster way (still tough) takes the road from Evan's Pass down to Godley Head/Boulder Bay.

Tired with Four Days to Go

Think that I’m back under -100 TSB. Feeling about as smoked as when I arrived at Turangi on the North Island.

More things that happen with the big training:

Day Ten Report

Didn't contest the KOM and felt great on the bike today. I think those maximal efforts _really_ take it out of the body. The guys that smashed the climb were pretty smoked by the end of the ride.

Very strong headwinds today that you can see in my bike file at TrainingPeaks. 3794kj, plenty of drafting and it still took 4.5 hrs to go 129KMs - that's a challenging ride.

With the rest day (yesterday) and the completion of the North Island (the day before that), a lot of the guys had themselves jazzed up to take-it-out fast. I'd been feeling a slight illness coming on so made an advance decision no to contest the KOM. Turned out to be a VERY good call as the pace was ON from the edge of town and that would have left a big mark (my CP120 was 246w, incl 0s) for my ride as it was so that might still overload my system. Time will tell!

Did a Greg Bennett main set on the bike -- alternate songs on the iPod -- 1 song threshold, 1 song steady. You can see that from 2.5 to 4.0 hrs in the file.

Morning was a favorite swim of mine from Monica...
500, 5x100
400, 4x100
300, 3x100
200, 2x100
100, 100

Third person rest interval and for the 100s we did odds IM. Felt really good in the water (always do when I swim often) and Lordy let me lead.

Snuck in a nap on arrival and have an easy run scheduled for just before dinner. Some of the lads are out doing mega runs - my jog to the Seal Colony, and back, will be plenty.

HUGE day scheduled for tomorrow - 180K to Christchurch with some tough rollers.

I want to share some thoughts on Weenie Training at some stage. I've had them in my head for a few months. Perhaps tomorrow -- need to get my legs up for a bit.

One last observation -- we saw SNOW today down to about 400meters on the mountains outside Kaikoura -- pretty cold today with weather coming direct from Antarctica. I was bundled up all day!

Newsom, More Changes & Addictive Progressions

Putting my Day 10 blog in the bag as I sense that tomorrow could be a bigger training day than scheduled. Plenty of folks talking about doing double swims and runs!


I wanted to put on record my thanks to Johno for organizing this trip.

There is a TON that goes on behind the scenes here at Epic and John's been putting the camp before his own training and enjoyment. A true professional. I just read in his blog that he's planning on opening it up a bit more on the bike so that might be interesting over the next few days. He crushed me on the KOM yesterday!

The route that we did down the North Island was excellent! I had no idea that there were roads/routes that great. I've been riding the main highways for years and missing out!

Provisional Points to End Day Eight

Day 9 is neutralized so there won't be any changes from this.

OVERALL

TOTAL
Steven Lord 100.50
Mark Pietrofesa 96.25
Gordo Byrn 94.00

Reflections at Day Nine

My main writing goal for today is to write my wife a love letter. So this entry will be a bit shorter.

Petro and I joke that it would sure be nice to right a "real blog" to make a change from spinning the I'm-doing-great-tale that we've been telling you!

Monica will get my "real blog".

Actually, there isn't a whole lot of difference between reality and what you read here. The reason is that the trip is so extreme that we all go through a HUGE range of emotions each day. It is up to each of us to choose what we focus on. In that, attitude (and action) is more habitual than elective.

My Goals and Day Eight

So, we did it. Rode the entire North Island. Everyone is completely torched and most of us don't even know it. Probably a good thing as there remains a heck of a lot of training to go!

Now that I've been blown out of both jersey competitions (Clas rode GREAT today), I think that it's appropriate to share my goals for the camp:

North Island Power Files, CSV

Had some battery issues and broke a spoke on Day Three -- however this will give you a flavor of what it has been like for me.

Rider weight 75 kilos
Rider FTP 300w (pre-camp)

Jan 3rd includes initial 30K TT
Jan 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th include KOMs (I think)

=========

A-Grade At Epic

Here at Epic Camp, after the first day, we let the rider leave early. It gives them a mental break to be off the front for a bit before they are caught (or not!) by the faster riders.

At this camp, I've been riding with the A-Team since the start. Because the way the camp played out, I've had a jersey on most days and, therefore, figured that I might as well ride with my fellow competitors. It's tough mentally, even when you are as mellow as me (right Molina?).

I'm one of the physically weaker "strong" guys so it get dealt a fair amount. Molina claims that he's the official whipping boy for Epic Camp but he skipped the Whakapapa Camp and missed a few runs so I'm taking the title. That said, my suffering is nothing compared to my homeboy, Mark "Petro" Pietrofesa. He's been in the Red Jersey early and has endured a whole hell of a lot of suffering.

As Bill Clinton would say, "I feel your pain".

Anyhow, I'll give you a breakdown with a few anecdotes.

Day One -- we all ride together (25 riders) to start the camp after 25K of running which included a 10K run race. Molina has a few too many beers at lunch and decides to "play". Group explodes, I don't play. Roll into the TT start last, have a decent ride Hinault-style (no bars).

Day Two -- we all start together (25 riders) and Johnny does such a good job pulling that Molina asks me later if he was working for me! Fast descent in the rain has me off the back (because I didn't want to DIE) and I have the bridge-from-hell when Tara decides to TT for a while. Later Tara's legs lock solid - her pull likely not a factor...

Day Three - we start together, I pull for about an hour - Lordy Lordy pulls through quite friendly. I rode pretty well to lunch, Petro explodes, we ride in together DEAD LAST!

Provisional Points to End Day Six

Lots of movement with this update - file below.

OVERALL

TOTAL
Steven Lord 74.50 YELLOW
Mark Pietrofesa 70.25 RED
Gordo Byrn 68.00
David Craig 67.00
Tara Norton 65.25
Russell Cox 64.75
Richard Blanco 63.75
Peter O'Brien 60.50
John Newsom 56.75
Douglas Scott 54.50
Clas Bjorling 51.50
Dave Langley 50.25
Nick Hutton 49.50
Rob Hill 49.00
Daniel McDonald 47.75
Scott Molina 47.75
Rip Oldmeadow 45.00
Eric Van Moorlehem 42.00
Robert Quantrell 39.25
Roger Wacker 38.75
Jordan Cantwell 37.75
Jo Carrit 34.00
Lee Wingate 27.00
Andrew Charles 25.00

=====

KOM
Gordo Byrn 73.00
Clas Bjorling 71.00
Steven Lord 64.00
Richard Blanco 61.00
Mark Pietrofesa 57.00
David Craig 53.00
Jo Carrit 52.00
John Newsom 46.00
Scott Molina 41.00
Roger Wacker 41.00
Peter O'Brien 33.00
Tara Norton 30.00
Douglas Scott 27.00
Russell Cox 25.00
Dave Langley 22.00
Nick Hutton 19.00
Rob Hill 18.00
Daniel McDonald 17.00
Rip Oldmeadow 17.00
Eric Van Moorlehem 11.00
Jordan Cantwell 9.00
Lee Wingate 9.00
Robert Quantrell 5.00
Andrew Charles 4.00

Changes and What We Eat

Had some questions about the changes that happen during extreme training as well as what we eat.

If you check out the team blog then you'll see a summary of what a few of the campers eat. There is a lot of variation between campers due to a few factors:

Size - we have campers ranging in height from 5 feet to 6-8. So there is a big difference in the amount of energy required to move our bodies due to mass. As well, there is a HUGE difference based on how well you can sit in the bunch, as well as which bunch you ride with.

Metabolic Fitness - we have super efficient campers (Steve Lord) and big engine campers (Mark Pietrofesa).

The big engine guys need to eat a lot; and they need to keep the sugar going in ALL day long. Rob Q was spotted drinking 2L of cola out of a pitcher at the end of a ride - I haven't had any cola yet (but I have had a lot of sports drink). The big guys need to eat constantly - small meals across the day as well as food before bed. If a big engine guy bonks then he's totally stuffed.

The efficient athletes, like Steve, can survive with limited calories (and drinks) when they want to. This is a big advantage in racing as well as on the long days. They tolerate depletion really well and can keep themselves ticking over with limited calories, if required. For me, the key lies in consistent nutrition that strictly limits sugar to the minimum required for aerobic function. I favor fats heavily for supplemental calories but... when you are riding big miles, point-to-point then that isn't always possible.

++

Changes

Not a lot of physical changes appear at camp but there are a few...

Healing - some folks will stop healing, get mouth ulcers, and have cold sores appear -- all signs of extreme immune stress.

Epic Camp - Day Five

Epic Camp is hard and Steven Lord is strong!

++

Got a little British Motorpacing in the middle of today's ride and it certainly left a mark! Scott's named Lord Steven the TGV and he lived up to his billing today!

Ride was ~6 hours with 182K of riding - ~4300 kjs and a heck of a lot of climbing.

Managed a good wetsuit and paddles swim but my running assumed zombie-training-pace. Petro and I ran ~8.5K, pulled into the BK Lounge then I walk-jogged back to the motel. A just get it done run. Steve ran 20K to take back Yellow. The guy deserves it as he's holding up really well and has a great attitude. He's fun to have around.

I'm going to have my hands full with getting through the camp! With this is mind, I'm going to take a tactical recovery day (if you can call 200K of riding with a KOM, recovery). My main concern is our 12-hour rule... you have to finish your training for the day 12 hrs after you start.

With the logistics, headwinds and structure of tomorrow... I was worried that I'd have to TT the final two hours of the ride then run a fast 10K to get my swim/bike/run bonus. I might make that but... there is a 200K ride as well as a rumored aquathon in the following 48 hrs and I don't want to smoke myself.

So it's wide open for Steve - he has a good shot to get a gap in the competition.

++

Lex is now speaking (Ball and Bird are her first words) and I miss my wife (HI HONEY!).

OK, gotta sleep. I get to sleep in until 7am tomorrow. Luxury.

At Epic Camp, everything is relative!

g

Epic Camp - Day Five

Epic Camp is hard and Steven Lord is strong!

++

Got a little British Motorpacing in the middle of today's ride and it certainly left a mark! Scott's named Lord Steven the TGV and he lived up to his billing today!

Ride was ~6 hours with 182K of riding - ~4300 kjs and a heck of a lot of climbing.

Managed a good wetsuit and paddles swim but my running assumed zombie-training-pace. Petro and I ran ~8.5K, pulled into the BK Lounge then I walk-jogged back to the motel. A just get it done run. Steve ran 20K to take back Yellow. The guy deserves it as he's holding up really well and has a great attitude. He's fun to have around.

I'm going to have my hands full with getting through the camp! With this is mind, I'm going to take a tactical recovery day (if you can call 200K of riding with a KOM, recovery). My main concern is our 12-hour rule... you have to finish your training for the day 12 hrs after you start.

With the logistics, headwinds and structure of tomorrow... I was worried that I'd have to TT the final two hours of the ride then run a fast 10K to get my swim/bike/run bonus. I might make that but... there is a 200K ride as well as a rumored aquathon in the following 48 hrs and I don't want to smoke myself.

So it's wide open for Steve - he has a good shot to get a gap in the competition.

++

Lex is now speaking (Ball and Bird are her first words) and I miss my wife (HI HONEY!).

OK, gotta sleep. I get to sleep in until 7am tomorrow. Luxury.

At Epic Camp, everything is relative!

g

Provisional Points to end Day Four

Yellow - G = Overall

Red - Petro = Vet

KOM - G, but not for long the way Clas was climbing today!

Play of the Day - David Craig for the 6AM 10K bonus run and scraping in under the 12-hour rule for a total of 10K run; 160K bike; and a 1K/5K aquathon

Summary follows...

Day Four Morning

A quick post before we set off this morning - need to keep the heat on Petro for the blog-a-thon.

++

Feel like I managed to catch up on sleep last night, which is a good thing as I was running low in the early days.

Cold breakfast this morning so I had my first couple Nutella sandwiches of the camp. We will see how that goes down. Bread and sugar isn't my preferred nutritional strategy.

David Craig brought a set of the Normatec recovery boots and has been sharing-the-love. The guys are reporting great results from them and they are receiving rave reviews.

An aquathon and a KOM today so there will be fireworks -- but before that -- a ferry across the harbour.

I've broken out the tea tree oil to keep my undercarriage happy -- two days ago I felt like I was wearing a wet diaper all day (we rode in the rain). Perhaps I'm still drying out!

++

OK, gotta roll and eat some more.

g

Characters & Highlights To Auckland

Well, we made it to Auckland -- that was a fair amount of effort to get back to where we started!

Petro says that I'm not writing enough. Well, Big Boy, that's because I'm calculating the points every night and it takes about an hour to sort it out!

++

Broke a spoke today, and nearly ripped my derailleur off! That could have been my tour right there.

Must be getting tired and need to be more careful with my shifting. Did a lot of work before lunch (nothing crazy though as my CP20 was 268w) then rode it in easy with Petro/Charlesy. Didn't get KJ after lunch but was 114KM to lunch with 4hrs ride time and 3125KJ - 48K from lunch into the hotel was done easy with my pal Petro who got a bit depleted in the early riding. Think we did another 2000m of climbing today.

Swam and run with Steve Lord, who will be in Yellow tomorrow from a bonus 10K tack-on. That's was a good tactical move as we had spare time this afternoon.

Epic Camp - Standings after Day Two

Sorry about the format.

Full Spreadsheet - Attached Below
These are provisional as athletes need to review

Gordo Byrn 41 18.00 15.00 33.00
Steven Lord 17.75 15.00 32.75
Mark Pietrofesa 16.25 15.00 31.25
Tara Norton 13.25 14.00 27.25
Russell Cox 17.00 10.00 27.00
David Craig 16.50 10.00 26.50
Peter O'Brien 14.00 9.00 23.00
Richard Blanco 15.50 6.00 21.50
John Newsom 17.25 4.00 21.25
Daniel McDonald 13.75 5.00 18.75
Scott Molina 13.50 4.00 17.50
Douglas Scott 8.50 9.00 17.50
Dave Langley 13.00 4.00 17.00
Rob Hill 12.75 4.00 16.75
Robert Quantrell 12.25 4.00 16.25
Nick Hutton 12.00 4.00 16.00
Clas Bjorling 10.75 5.00 15.75
Jordan Cantwell 10.75 5.00 15.75
Randy Weintraub 11.50 4.00 15.50
Eric Van Moorlehem 11.00 4.00 15.00
Jo Carrit 5.00 9.00 14.00
Roger Wacker 11.75 0.00 11.75
Rip Oldmeadow 7.25 4.00 11.25
Lee Wingate 6.00 4.00 10.00
Andrew Charles 5.00 4.00 9.00

============

Yellow - G
KOM - G
Red (Vet) - Petro
Play of the Day - Green - Tara

Day One "triathlon" TT results shown in separate tab.

g

Cape Reinga to Kaitaia - Epic Camp

Big day today. Not for volume but for work rate. About 90 minutes worth of Threshold split between bike/run. We were all cramping in the pool at the end of the day. All of us except Clas -- it helps to be made of steel!

We started at the top of the country at the lighthouse to the left. We ran ~12K easy through Monster Rollers down the main road. I ran easy and chatted with Roger Wacker from Texas. Roger is coming back from a run injury AND had a major mechanical today on his bike. Despite that, he stuck with it, didn't quit and - because of that - won the Green Jersey for play of the day.

Johno took the running race out fast (uphill start; either up/down; net elevation loss) and I stuck with him. Johno NEVER breathes when he races -- what I mean there is that I can never hear him breathing when I am racing him. Well, I was able to hear him today. Clas is a super downhill runner and bridge up, then past, us on a long downhill section. I stuck with Clas and held effort through a nice 1K flatter section. That was enough to get enough of a gap to hold him off for the downhill finish. I ran about 37 minutes but it felt tougher than that time reflects!

Petro, Steve, Johno and I tacked on - gently - to get to 25K of running.

Epic Update & Windows of Opportunity

Ran with Petro and the gang this morning. Legs felt fantastic - as they always do for the first couple of runs at Epic.

Mark and I played a game last night - think about who you spent New Year's 1999 with and how many of those people are still in your life.

QOTD from Petro about family: "You're going to need to learn to live with a bit more chaos, or you're not going to make it."

The quote came because he's been skype-ing the US. When using Skype, he just leaves the connection open (on speakerphone) and hangs out with the person on the other line. Drives me a bit nuts because there is garbled noise coming through his computer all the time.

It's the anti-gordo-call method... no plan, no purpose, extended time... I'm more about calling with a mission, achieving the mission, moving along. The only person I hang-out with is Monica (and myself).

Epic Update & Sports/Kids/Marriage

Because I arrived a day early (and we have the world's best support team), I have the afternoon off to sort my gear and write this update.

Kids, Marriage and Sport thoughts are at the bottom.

We are running a run game for January (open to all - that is our tracking sheet) so I started my day with two 30 minute runs that had a 3K swim inside them. The swim was simple:

  • 1000 continuous every 4th 50 back
  • 10x150 odds as 50 long strokes, 50 fast, 50 steady // evens easy
  • 4x50 odds 20 back / 25 breast / evens easy
  • 200 IM
  • 100 easy

Jordan Cantwell and Richard Blanco joined me for this session. Mark "Petro" Pietrofesa decided to sleep load -- he's my roommate and a good buddy.

There were no takers for my easy spin from Central Auckland to the airport hotel so I did an hour easy on my own (640 kj; 25km). At the start of that ride, I said g'day to Charlesy and Dave from Brisbane -- my buddies from the Coyote Cycling crew in Brisbane.

As I get tired, type-os will start to appear - please bear with me on that!

Surviving or Racing?

Joe wrote an interesting article last week about the future of triathlon (see the Winner articles). The article was great because it acted as a catalyst for discussion, reaction and emotion. Four days (and probably a few hundred emails) later Joe issued a clarification of what he meant to say. Frankly, I thought he said it pretty well in Part One.

When I read that article I was quite fired up and wrote a rather lengthy 'comment' on his page... then remembered President Lincoln's advice and deleted it!

I'm glad that I did because Joe's clarification was effective at spelling out his key point, which I'll come to. Wrapped around his key point were some truths about endurance training that likely made some of his readers a bit excited. I know that his comments gained traction on the net.

Remember Obama's guns, religion and bitterness line? Speaking one's opinion plainly doesn't always advance your cause.

Emotional responses happen when a respected figure points out truths that we'd rather not see. In fact, you could say that is the definition of a true friend -- an individual that's willing to share unpleasant truths about us.

Understanding Intensity - Part Three

No compression socks in this week's photo! Makes a change, eh?

Part One discussed different ways to look at appropriate training zones -- heart rate, power, metabolic function, lactate profile. Hopefully, it also gave you a practical example about how you should be wary of using another athlete's tolerance to decide your own.

Part Two stripped out all the technical stuff and made the point that, ultimately, you should judge your training by what you can repeat.


This week I will offer some ideas to consider when assessing why, what, when and how... to ramp your training load. Remember that load is a function of frequency, duration and relative intensity.

Understanding Intensity - Part One

This week's article will require you to put on your thinking caps. It looks long but that's because of all the charts.

This series is going to touch on an aspect of my performance philosophy that is best summed up by a recent Kona Qualifier... why train fast if you are racing slow.

The best coaches/athletes in our sport have an inherent understanding of these issues - they might not use fancy charts but their programs/approach take into account what follows.

Part Two will be my article for XTri.com next week -- it is going to be a LOT more straightforward than what follows. If you are able to wrap your head around Part One, I think, you'll get more from Part Two.

Let's go!


Something that I noticed early in my athletic career was a huge difference in my tolerance for different types of workload.

The biggest example that I can remember with my own training was the effect that high intensity and flat steady-state riding had on my fatigue. I would become absolutely whipped.

Athletes have large variability in their tolerance for both workload and relative intensity. Over the years I have had this explained to me as:

Constitution - some athletes have superior constitutions... they can just handle it.

Experience - athletes have been racing fast, or training strong, since they were young kids... they can just handle it.

Mental Strength - the athletes that can't handle it are mentally weak. They could do it if they would harden up. You need to buckle down, toughen up and just handle it.

Part of the reason why I dislike HTFU is the philosophy points many athletes in COMPLETELY the wrong direction. STFD is more appropriate for the majority of people that I coach (slow ... ... down), perhaps Steady ... ... Up (STFU).

Understanding Athletic Performance

We were very fortunate to have Dave Scott as our special guest to close out our July Boulder Camp this week. Dave made the observation that, more than protocol, what defines a Master Coach is the ability to get an athlete to do work.

Like all great athletes I have met, Dave is passionate about protocol. In fact, the strongest similarity between top athletes lies not in their programs, but in the powerful belief they have in their program.

Across the week of our Boulder camp we had presentations from Marilyn & Chris McDonald; Laura & Greg Bennett; Bobby McGee; Dave Scott and Justin Daerr.

One of the challenges facing a passionate athlete is the fact that every speaker will talk about a different approach -- some speakers will also share multiple approaches that they have used across a 10-30 year athletic career. This can be confusing!


Let's start with the basics:

What work-rate is required for YOU to achieve your goals?
Most athletes, and coaches, are unable to answer this question. That's a shame because this is a fundamental aspect of performance and will greatly impact the appropriate strategy to employ with your training.

For me to go sub-4 in a Half Ironman, 275 watts of average output is likely to be required (at least!). The word "average" is important there because, to optimize my race, I will need to be able to recover below that effort and sustain extended periods above that effort.

One school of thought is to build the capacity to hold that exact level of output.

Looking at my lactate profile, you will see that level of output is a Threshold effort for me.


Click to blow these charts up in a lightbox

Putting It Together

Our photo this week is my daughter watching me set a personal best for push-ups (she prefers to check me out in the mirror).

I need to score 300 on my APFT so I can back off the upper body work. Greg Bennett says that my freestyle looks like I am wrestling down the lane!

Typically my fly is my only stroke that looks like it came out of the Rocky Balboa school of swim excellence...


So I've been rolling for two weeks and have a good idea on my baseline data. Before I get into my story I wanted to offer you some tips on your own training.

The EC Team have been writing a weekly column for XTri for six months now. I think you'll find a lot of good content there from each of us. We have a range of philosophies that are consistent at the core and different at the edges. Worth checking out if you get the chance.

Over the last two weeks, I completed a How-To-Manual for triathlon training. Here's how you apply what I have written:

Date Focus
Monday Swim using tips from Benchmarking Your Swimming
Tuesday Long Run using tips from Runing Well
Wednesday Unload with day off or easy aerobic training
Thursday Brick using tips from World Class Endurance
Friday

The Cure

Our lead off photo this week is Jan Hugo Svendsen - my latest viking buddy.

Jonas "Big J" Colting crowned him King-for-a-Day when he held off the entire camp to take line honors at a stage of the Tour of Sweden.

When the chase bunch contains Clas Bjorling and Bjorn Andersson... it's a huge achievement for an agegrouper to finish first!


Some of my athletes think that I am a mind reader because I have an uncanny knack of knowing what they are thinking. Truth is, I have a limited capacity to read people (just ask my wife)... however, I have built a decent capacity to see, then express what's going on inside my head.

To the extent that I have any wisdom, it is due to slowing my mind down enough to have brief periods of insight into my own patterns and though habits.

Do work, Son!

I had an interesting question from one of the athletes that I work with that went along the lines of,

“Coach, I just had a look at Joe Blow’s performance manager chart from last year (Joe Blow is a top AG athlete). I almost put in the same amount of work as him. Our CTL #’s were almost identical but our performances were a world apart. What gives?”

Upcoming Webinars

March 16th -- Noon Denver -- Long Course First Timers -- we'll chat about approaching your first long course event. Hopefully, I'll save you from some of the mistakes I've made over the years!


Contact Me for a slot and/or send in your questions in advance.

Free to all and available for download after the fact.